The Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) is also known as the New Mexico Cutthroat Trout.  This species is native to cold mountain streams and lakes of much of northern New Mexico.  They have a yellow-green to gray-brown body with scattered black spots.  The latter third of the fish is heavily spotted with black.  There are several red streaks under the throat which give it it’s name.  Typical adults are up to 10 inches in length and weight about 1 pound.  Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout live up to 8 years.
     The species feeds on a wide variety of aquatic invertebrates including insects, zooplankton and crustaceans.  They breed in spring and early summer and prefer water temperature between 48-52 degrees Fahrenheit.  Females lay a wide range in the number of eggs from 200 to 4,500.  They are laid in a gravel nest in flowing water where there are high levels of dissolved oxygen.
     The species has declined in recent years because of the introduction of Rainbow Trout and neighboring land practices.  The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish is responsible for managing sport fishing in the state and has a program to restore and rehabilitate populations in the state.